This image shows atomic hydrogen scattering sunlight in the upper atmosphere of Mars, as seen by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph on NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission. About 400,000 observations, taken over the course of four days

MAVEN mission observes ups and downs of water escaping from Mars

UI research contributing to latest findings
University of Iowa scientists have contributed to the latest findings about what happened to the water on early Mars. Jasper Halekas, investigator on the MAVEN mission, led one of several studies that revealed swings in the planet’s water loss depended on Mars’s distance from the sun.
image of jupiter from Juno

Jupiter’s spooky sounds

UI instrument captures emissions from Jupiter’s auroras
There are some haunting sounds coming from Jupiter. An instrument designed and built at the University of Iowa recorded the spooky sounds from the planet’s auroras during the first full orbit by the NASA spacecraft Juno. Several UI researchers are involved in the mission to our solar system’s largest planet.
bill kurth in office with jupiter backdrop and instrument model

Jupiter rendezvous

UI instrument, researchers involved in NASA’s Juno mission
On Independence Day, a NASA spacecraft entered Jupiter's orbit, and the University of Iowa had an instrument along for the ride. The Plasma Waves Instrument, designed and built at the UI, will sample plasma waves and learn how Jupiter's intense auroras are produced.
researchers working in iceland

Shifting sands on Mars

UI researchers travel to Iceland to learn more about sand dunes on the Red Planet
University of Iowa researchers are traveling to Iceland to better understand sand dunes found all over the planet Mars. They hope the Iceland site will show how Martian sands have changed, which could yield more clues about Mars's geological history and the possibility of discovering microbial life entombed there.
Jake McCoy in clean room

Master tinkerer

UI graduate student lands NASA fellowship to create sophisticated space X-ray instrument
A University of Iowa physics graduate student has won a coveted NASA fellowship. Jake McCoy is building a sophisticated tool that may help astrophysicists locate missing matter in the cosmos through X-rays emitted by dark, distant areas in space.

What caused Martian desiccation?

University of Iowa researchers involved in NASA announcement of what happened to Mars' water and atmosphere
Mars has been all over the news, from the finding of seasonal water on the Red Planet to the successful film "The Martian." Now, researchers, including those at the UI, have learned more about what happened to Mars' climate since it was a warm, watery planet billions of years ago.
illustration of halloas in orbit

Halo satellite will search for 'missing' normal matter

UI professor receives NASA grant for research
University of Iowa professor Philip Kaaret has won a $3.7 million NASA grant to build a satellite that will search for missing matter in hot gases associated with the Milky Way galaxy.
University of Iowa celebrates 50 years of space physicist Don Gurnett's research and teaching

Gurnett symposium draws leaders in space science

Oct. 17 event celebrates physics and astronomy professor's legacy
With Don Gurnett, and James Van Allen before him, the University of Iowa has a strong legacy of leading the scientific community in the exploration and understanding of space.
Don Gurnett in classroom with spacecraft model

Space giant

UI holds symposium to honor Don Gurnett's 50 years of space exploration and teaching at the UI
The University of Iowa will host a symposium on Oct. 17 to honor physics professor Don Gurnett, who has taught and been engaged in space science at the UI for the past 50 years. The symposium is free and open to the public.
The team looks over specifications for their design.

Seniors to reenact Van Allen radiation belt experiments

57-year-old experiment from UI will ignite new research
Four graduating seniors are helping to reenact a famous experiment from a University of Iowa scientist, helping to set new discoveries in motion.