Oat hulls

Bravo to biomass

UI study shows using oat hulls for power has considerable benefits to the environment and human health
A new University of Iowa study, published in the journal "Fuel," documents that biomass burning has positive environmental and public-health effects. Co-firing oat hulls with coal reduced emissions of carbon dioxide, particulate matter, and heavy metals compared with burning coal alone.
a man with a hardhat squats by a mix of coal and straw-like Miscanthus

Seeing benefit of biomass

Farmers, lawmakers tour miscanthus sites, Power Plant to learn about campus energy project
The University of Iowa hosted a show-and-tell of sorts Aug. 25, introducing federal and state lawmakers, farmers, and others to a new, locally grown crop the UI plans to use to produce energy on campus.
wind turbines

Iowa Public Radio Butler discusses state's vital role in wind power

P. Barry Butler, University of Iowa executive vice president and provost and professor of mechanical and industrial engineering, discusses President Obama's new plan, the hurdles to wind energy production, and what's next for wind energy in Iowa.

MEDIA ADVISORY: UI to host Biomass Fuel Project Field Day

Event will highlight sustainable energy efforts
The University of Iowa will host its 2015 Biomass Fuel Project Field Day. The Biomass Fuel Project was recently recognized as a recipient of the Iowa Governor's Environmental Excellence Award.
UI's Iowa Flood Center helps control water at local, regional, national levels

An eye on our most vital resource

Individuals, local governments, and national organizations make use of the Iowa Flood Center's research
How do local governments and national agencies monitor one of our most valuable resources? With research and data from the Iowa Flood Center.

Glory to the grass

UI wins governor's award for initiative to use grass type as renewable energy source
The University of Iowa has been recognized by the Iowa governor's office for an initiative to use a locally available grass as a renewable energy source. The UI's use of the grass, called Giant Miscanthus, is part of its goal of achieving 40 percent renewable energy consumption by 2020.